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I'm guessing that the novel doesn't mention what became of Billy. Does the novel specifically state, though, that Billy was George's "grade school friend" - which, I guess, would sort of imply that that they weren't still friends by 1955? If that's the case, I suppose it could be for any number of reasons. Maybe Billy just moved away - or else, maybe George failing to defend Billy from the bully did place a strain in their friendship. I'm just wondering if anyone can shed any light on this? Bttf4444 02:00, 31 October 2008 (UTC)

  • The novelization doesn't say, of course. Stockhausen isn't mentioned anywhere else, and I suspect that he was no longer living in Hill Valley by 1955. George Gipe added quite a bit of psychological food for thought when it came to describing the unspoken thoughts of the characters, exploring their psyches, and trying to explain what might have influenced their personality-- particularly with George McFly. Gipe was describing George's anxieties and George's underlying humiliation and anger about his fear of confronting Biff. (I've run across the novelization a lot in used book stores, and it's usually available for a few bucks). As in the film, Marty's willingness to stand up to Biff is the difference between George living a life of meekness or of assertiveness. In the case of the novel, Gipe is describing George's demons. McFord 13:11, 31 October 2008 (UTC)
If you don't have the book, this is the source from page 32, and you'll see what I mean about Gipe's writing, describing middle-aged George in 1985, right after George is humiliated in front of his son: "During his frequent moods of quiet self-analysis, George McFly managed to dissect his psyche, for he did worry about his own lack of grit. He thought it all went back to one occasion in grade school when he was accosted by the class bully. The bully had just punched his friend Billy Stockhausen and for a split-second, George was so angry he literally saw the red that everyone talks and writes about. Stepping up to the bully, he pulled his fist back -- And couldn't strike. The bully merely smirked and walked away. Since that moment thirty-five years ago, George had wondered what might have happened if he had followed through." Even if the bully had hit back, Gipe adds "might not that have been better than the cowardly limbo, never-take-a-chance attitude George had trapped himself in all these years?" In the film, of course, George can't be heard thinking this (while he holds his stomach as if in pain from ulcers). McFord 13:25, 31 October 2008 (UTC)
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